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can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: mark pinksy is the president and ceo of a nonprofit designed to align money and capital with political, economic, and social justice, opportunity finance network. ofm, and i am sure we will get to that. good to have you on the program. >> good to be here. tavis: i am not the only one continuing to do as much as we can on the issue of poverty, and this includes so much. what often does not get talked about is the fight back. i do not want to be guilty of only talking about the ugly and the bad but not talk about the significant work done by those who are trying to dig their way out over this hole that so many of all colors find themselves in. your company hopes to try to alleviate this pain and suffering. let me talk to you about what ofm does and get some specifics about the fight back on poverty. >> i appreciate your pain attention to this issue because it is one that often gets lost. opportunity finance network has what is called the community finance development institution
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: anthony edwards currently stars in the new drama "zero hour." this is his first series since starring as martin green in the hit series, er. he is currently involved in making a documentary about the challenges faced by military vets as they integrate into society. let's take a look at a scene ."om "zero hour >> you have been acting different. please just talk to us. >> i saw something, something i cannot explain. the guy looked like you? >> he did not look like me. he looked exactly like me. >> that does not make any sense. >> there has to be a rational explanation. >> don't you want to know him? ?ho he was pronounce >> if i focus on that now i will drop the ball. >> then send me. i will get it. >> one condition. you tell them exactly nothing about where i am going. tavis: how you think about my efforts to describe the show? >> that is a scene. they have been advertising it. there is a lot of action. i am used to seeing explosions and running, but
.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: i am sure none of us has to be reminded just how much twitter, facebook, and instagram an old email as transform our lives. in a new text called "citizenville," gavin newsom looks at how it can help break through gridlock and ensure that everyone in this country as a seat at the decision making. good to have you on. >> thanks. tavis: first of all, congratulations on your wife's recent spirit award. >> yes, she just one of the spirit award, and then they are nominated for their documentary called "the invisible war," which is about raved in the military. understanding some of the complexities. even if only 10 percent of this film is right, as i told my wife, we should stop and own up to it. leon panetta weighed in on this, and hopefully others will. it goes to the frustration. this is frankly one of the reasons why i wrote this book. i am so disinterested and increasingly disengaged with these stale debates over who is to blame. i want to focus more on what
hunger out. pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: jamie williams is a noted author. she is -- amy wilentz is a noted author. her latest revisits the nation of haiti. it is called "farewell, fred voodoo." we should start by talking about the title. >> friend voodoo is a name the international press corps used to name for the haitian on the street. what i would like to say is they are trained to go deeper than that and not just have a stereotypical view of haitians and what old colonists used to associate with their religion, but something real and in control of their own will, so farewell to the old image. let's look get the new -- look at the new haiti. tavis: what would you say is the typical american view? >> there is a lot of reality. impoverished. we associate in the u.s. poverty with backwardness, especially in a nation filled with akron people is american thing. and there is to do, -- is voodoo, and that image of them being associated with religion thought of assets -- as superstition and black magic. i have gone to a lot of voodoo ceremonies, and they are not what
national dialogue about guns. pbs has dedicated much of this week's programming to exploring the alarming rise of gun violence around the country and especially to so-called rampage killings. yet in many urban communities, some right here in northern california, people live with pervasive gun violence on a daily basis. tonight, we devote our full program to the topic of gun violence here in the bay area. later we'll hear from a panel of experts. but first, a group of citizens fed up with the violence are pleading to be heard. their story was reported in collaboration with students from the uc berkeley graduate school of journalism. >> what do we want? >> peace! >> when do we want it? >> now! >> every saturday morning a group of oakland residents gathers at a site of a recent murder to protest gun violence in their city. >> stop the violence! stop the violence! do something! >> they call themselves s.a.v.e., an acronym for soldiers against violence everywhere. >> we are soldiers. we're out here in the rain, cold, doing what we do. >> s.a.v.e. was started in 2010 by the pastor at oakland's
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)